The Motherwell board will meet on Monday as they seek a new full-time manager

following the sacking of Ian Baraclough.

The Fir Park club say 57 applications have been received for the post, with the number expected to rise to over 70.

General Manager Alan Burrows says there may not be an early appointment.

“A lot of them are very high class candidates. A lot of them are currently in jobs, which is quite interesting,” said Burrows.

“I think we would like to make the appointment as soon as possibly, but – paradoxically – not rush it, if that makes sense.”

Stephen Craigan took charge for the 2-1 victory over Partick Thistle, and the former club captain remains undecided over whether or not he will apply for the post.

The club hope to have a shortlist of candidates drawn up by the middle of next week.

“We want someone to take the club forward, someone to galvanise us and lift us and that’s what the board will set out to do from Monday onwards,” continued Burrows.

“There’s always pressure to appoint a manager, it’s such a big decision. It has ramifications for every corner of the football clubs.

Alan Burrows (left) and Ian Baraclough

Alan Burrows (left) and Ian Baraclough celebrate defeating Rangers in the play-offs last season

“The board at this club have a fairly good record over the last 15-20 years of appointing managers. Most of them have had some modicum of success in some shape or form.”

Motherwell enjoyed a number of highly successful seasons in the Scottish top flight under Stuart McCall. Despite the lean times last season and this season, Burrows believes the club remains an attractive proposition to high-calibre managerial candidates.

“It’s a good club, good people at the club, the directors back their manager – as they did with Ian Baraclough – to every degree they can.

“Whoever the manager the board appoints will inherit a talented squad of players who haven’t performed the way we would like – that’s reflected by the league position and going out of the League Cup – but I still think there’s hope, and that’s been reflected in the number and quality of applicants.”